Word of the Week #113:

Nostalgia

I don’t often take vacations. The kind of work that I do and the kind of life that I live just does not afford me that kind of luxury.

Of course, one could argue that, given how flexible and balanced my life already is, I might not really need a vacation.

Well, there is some merit to that premise, but there are several more details to consider.

Firstly, balanced may be a term you can use to describe my work schedule now, but that was far from true till the last summer.

Secondly, no matter how much you love something, fatigue does eventually set in. Taking no real breaks for a span of four years can be strenuous for even the most tenacious of us.

So, when I hurt my knee while playing basketball last week—a severe strain to the lateral ligaments—and the orthopaedist asked me to rest, I decided to take a break from work as well. Just take a week to relax…

Seeing how I tend to overwork throughout the monsoon, as there is little else to do, the timing could not have been better.

It is still a forced vacation, as each one I take tends to be, but it has been quite fun nonetheless.

I finally got to take my old PlayStation out of its box; the first time in several months. As it would turn out, NFS Most Wanted is still as fun as it was almost a decade ago, though the races somehow seems slightly more difficult than I can remember. Also, the way my shoulders and lower back start aching after just a couple of hours is an entirely new experience.

I often draw some flak for calling myself old, but the truth is, I do feel older. Things do change, as we grow older, and we often do not realise just how much.

One of the things I have noticed is that people seem to stop doing what they used to love doing as kids. I cannot think of any reasonable explanations for it, to be honest. Excuses, perhaps, but no explanations.

If you stop having fun, what is even the point of being alive, right? If you know something is fun, why postpone doing it? It is not like we have forever to wait…

So, this week, I plan to have some fun. Perhaps a little extra, just to compensate for the entire year.

Replaying NFS was fun, but now my thumbs feel weird, so I have to stop. Perhaps I will rewatch an old movie I love. Or perhaps I shall reread an old Agatha Christie that I have not touched for a few years.

There is just a different pleasure to redoing things you love, right?

My room is cosy and my heart is happy. This is going to be a good week.

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Word of the Week #68:

Petrichor

Even as I write this, I can hear the clouds rumbling in the background, as the storm comes rolling over from, presumably, the Bay of Bengal.

In stark contrast to Western Literature, which has largely portrayed storms and rains as being dreary and foreboding at best, folk culture closer home has had more favourable response. And, of course, one need not look too far to understand the reasons behind the same.

You see, living in a tropical peninsula almost entirely reliant on the monsoons for survival pretty much guarantees a positive reaction upon the arrival of the rains.

Sure, a couple of weeks in, as we now are, we might sit indoors grumbling about the muddy roads and the stinky shirts and the recurrent network troubles, and the possibilities of going outdoors that might have existed, but for the weather, and yet you will have to admit: You did smile when the scent of the moist earth first wafted into your homes.

It is only fair, I would say. The love for the rain, it is a part of our heritage.

And now that the storm is breaking, what more can we do, but sit indoors with an Agatha Christie in one hand and a warm snack in the other… Really, what more do you need?

 

Book of the Week #26:

Murder on the Orient Express,

by Agatha Christie

So, this is the third time we are featuring Agatha Christie in this list.

Only third? That is quite surprising… When I began, I intended to feature at least 20-25 of her books. So many wonderful books, so little time…

What is even more surprising is the fact that this is the only book I read after I watched the movie. Continue reading Book of the Week #26:

Book of the Week #14:

Sparkling Cyanide,

by Agatha Christie

Six people were thinking of Rosemary Barton who had died nearly a year ago…

With that simple sentence began the first Agatha Christie book I ever read.

Not to be confused with the first Agatha Christie book I ever owned

And considering that I have read and loved half the books by this lady, who wrote almost a hundred books, if you count the collections of short-stories and plays, and the autobiographical works, it should be no surprise that she features twice in this list within three months.

Continue reading Book of the Week #14:

Writer Guy’s Tip #3: The Narrative

Okay, a quick recap, before we begin…

So far, you should-

  1. Have a rough idea of the plot, and the primary characters of your story.
  2. Have a fair idea of the setting of your world.
  3. Have not written too much, already, or are willing to rewrite.
  4. Have, most certainly and without fail, read the previous post.

Now, this is the first time I am really urging you to read the previous post, but that is just the nature of the topics. The Plot and the Narrative have to go hand-in-hand… Continue reading Writer Guy’s Tip #3: The Narrative

Book of the Week #2:

The Clocks,

by Agatha Christie

I looked at her. Sheila was my girl—the girl I wanted—and wanted for keeps. But it wasn’t any use having illusions about her.

Of all the Agatha Christie books I have owned, and there have been many, this was the very first one. And after much consideration and deliberation, I decided that this would be the first one of her books that I speak about. And I can say with quite some certainty that this will not be the last.

Continue reading Book of the Week #2: