Word of the Week #167:

Dredge

You know, life is like a cake.

Now, now, stay with me. I’m going somewhere with this.

You see, first, you spend a lot of time getting the ingredients ready. You might have a lot of specific ideas about the ingredients you want to choose but, in the end, you have to take what you get and work with it.

Then you work the ingredients such that they are ready to rise and grow.

Then you put everything in the right conditions, and you hope everything goes well.

Lastly, you add icing and sprinkles and, well, whatever you think you want to make this cake perfect.

Now, I would say that the icing represents the romantic relationships in your life: Some cannot imagine a cake without the icing, while others couldn’t care for it one bit.

I believe I understand cakes well enough to tell a good cake from a bad one, no matter how well you try to hide it under the most flattering of frostings. 

Nonetheless, I won’t imply that I prefer cakes without frosting.

Just, it should be a good cake and a good icing, and the two should match.

Now, when do things go bad? When you try to add icing to raw batter. While the results may be edible, it is not what you wanted, right?

So this is generally sound advice: Don’t add icing to your half-baked life. It is a recipe for disaster.

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Word of the Week #159:

Zest

You know, when I was young, like, really young, my parents signed me up for a skating class.

Now, I fail to see how this skill would prove useful over the course of my lifetime, but okay…

Anyway, these classes… I absolutely hated them!

I was uncomfortable and clumsy, and I always struggled with the equipment.

I was not too bad at it, I thought. I could complete all the drills adequately and I never had any particularly painful or embarrassing falls.

I just didn’t like doing it. It was just not fun.

But every evening, my mom would give me one piece of chewy andy each time I left for the class, and promised another when I got back.

To my young heart, that piece of candy was one of the biggest accomplishments I could comprehend. It was worth the effort, the pain, the overall annoyance.

And for that piece of candy, I kept going back to the class every successive day.

One evening, I was laughing so hard that the candy actually flew out of my mouth and out of the window down onto the road. I swear, in that one moment, I felt a piece of myself die.

Now, considering all of this, I think it may sound odd, but I actually hated that candy too! It tasted like an orange peel flavoured eraser.

Personally, I have always prefer clean, unflavoured erasers, but that is beside the point…

I don’t think I ever mentioned this to my mom. I was never the most vocal of kids. I was always more of a ‘how-do-you-not-know-EXACTLY-how-I-feel-right-now’ kind of kid.

In fact, I don’t think I even mentioned that I didn’t like the skating class either.

Eventually, I did get good at skating. We had switched my old, clunky skated for a new, cool, more cooperative ones. We had begun focusing less on drills and more on free skating.

Eventually, I started to enjoy skating for what it is.

And almost immediately afterwards, the class ended. And I have no idea why.

But at least the candy ended too. And for some reason, I kind of miss it now…

Word of the Week #144:

Quantum

So, another year has passed by us.

On occasions like these, it is customary to take a moment to look back at the key events of  the year. Luckily, I managed to outsource that task to an engineer in Bangalore…

Boy, am I going to get smacked for that… Eh, moving on.

You see, when we do do these kinds of things, we tend to focus too much on events that are merely stepping stones that lead us to more stepping stones.

You might think getting that new job, or a major promotion, made the year special, but did it, really? Sure, it may lead to something else that is special, but is it special in and of itself?

I don’t know; to me, it is not the big events that make my life special. It is the little things, things that are almost impossible to substantiate, but are substantial nonetheless.

Things like the smile on someone’s face when they taste the food you cooked, or the quiver in their voice when you get them something they really need but refuse to buy for themselves, or the shimmer in their eyes when you tell them how they make you feel.

The little things… 

“Some moments are nice, some are nicer, some are even worth writing about.”
― Charles Bukowski