Word of the Week #103:

Vexation

Generally, I love science fiction, especially the futuristic ones.

And while I do enjoy a good post-apocalyptic dystopia, tonight I am talking about the more urban futurism, the kind one would expect from something like I, Robot or Avatar or Fifth Element, or even Altered Carbon, more recently.

I love how these stories transport us to a wonderful world where the realm of reality has been expanded upto, and often beyond, the limit of our expectations.

The brief escape they provide can be valuable…

This escape, however, comes at a cost. The stark contrast they offer to this ridiculously mundane world of ours can be quite disheartening, and even infuriating at times.

Sure, technology has advanced by leaps and bounds over the past couple of decades, but it has not even nearly caught up to what was promised in Back To The Future.

And do you know where this contrast between what is and what could be becomes the most jarring? Why, the banking sector, of course…

Have you been to a bank, lately? Since the advent of e-banking and such, we don’t have to, as often as we used to, so we don’t have necessarily care as much. However, an occasional encounter is enough to remind us exactly how archaic and patchy our banks still are.

I mean, an entire afternoon to reset your net banking password and linking your PAN to your account is not reasonable, okay.

And the removal of what doesn’t work is really the bare minimum. There are still way too much we can do, and it is annoying when nobody does it.

Now, is it fair to blame them for not living up to our expectations? I don’t see why not.You see, the technology does exist. If you won’t use it for banking, of all things, then where will you?

As consumers, it is our right, nay, duty, to keep whining about mediocrity, and to keep dreaming about excellence.

As a great man once said, the future must remain bright.

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Word of the Week #60:

Morbid

No, we are not talking about obesity. People can be so touchy, you know.

Instead, let us talk about people on the opposite end of the scale; people who actually need more of our attention than they currently do. So, obviously, we are not talking about fashion models either…

Today, as we speak, over 20 million people lie at risk at death from starvation. This comes after it was concluded well over a hundred years ago that distribution of food is more to blame for famines than its actual scarcity.
Continue reading Word of the Week #60:

Book of the Week #23:

The Time Machine,

by H. G. Wells

“We are always getting away from the present moment. Our mental existence, which are immaterial and have no dimensions, are passing along the Time-Dimension with a uniform velocity from the cradle to the grave.”

—The Time Traveller

Okay, let me start off by stating quite frankly that I am not very fond of time travel. I would not like to discuss its scientific plausibility; it is far beyond my realm of expertise.

However, if popular science fiction is any indicator, it would probably cause quite a lot of trouble. Just refer to Flashpoint, and you will see what I mean.

H. G. Wells is, along with Jules Verne, often considered the Father of Science Fiction, responsible for coining the term “time-machine”, and the subsequent popularisation of the entire concept of time-travel.

Considering the fact that it was published in 1895, the scientific and logical accuracy of his work makes it all the more impressive. Continue reading Book of the Week #23: